Making momos with Stef Reid and Dr Indra

Stef with prosthetics
Stef Reid visits the prosthetics department at Anandaban Hospital

On her recent trip to Nepal to visit Anandaban Hospital, Paralympian Stef Reid spent time with staff including Anandaban’s Medical Director Dr Indra Napit and his family. Former Celebrity Masterchef contestant Stef had the chance to try her hand at Nepalese cooking at one of Dr Indra’s ‘momo parties’, where he gathers friends together to make momos before tucking into a delicious meal together. He’s provided us with his recipe, so now you can make them too. Why not hold your own momo party and let us know how you get on?

How to make momos

480g plain flour
1kg minced chicken
50g chopped fresh coriander
150g chopped onions
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 tablespoon sunflower oil
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Salt and chilli powder to your taste
Non-stick cooking spray

1. Mix together the flour and 375ml water in a bowl. Knead the dough well until it is medium firm and flexible. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, mix together the chicken, coriander, onions, garlic, ginger, cumin, turmeric, lemon juice, salt and chilli powder (we use a tablespoon of salt and half a  teaspoon of chilli powder) in a bowl. Mix in 250ml water.

Kneading dough

3. To make the momo wrappers: break off a piece of dough weighing roughly 30g and roll into a ball. Place the ball on a flat surface and roll into a piece about three inches round with a rolling pin. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Rolling the dough
making wrappers
4. Spray a steamer pan with cooking spray.

5. Place a teaspoon of the chicken filling in the middle of a wrapper. Holding the wrapper in your left hand, use your right thumb and index finger to start pinching the edges of the wrapper together. Pinch and fold until the edges of the circle close up, then place the momo in the steamer pan. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling.

Adding filling
Uncooked momos
6. Fill the steamer pot half full with water and bring to a boil. Set the steamer pan with the momos on top of the pot and cover with a tight lid. Steam the momos for 15 minutes.

In the steamer
Cooked momos
7. Serve your hot momos with pickle (read on to find out how to make it) or another dip of your choice!

Stef Reid with finished momos

How to make pickle

500g tomatoes
250g sesame seeds
100g peanuts (fried)
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon minced ginger
1 teaspoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon turmeric
1 tablespoon sunflower oil
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Salt and chilli powder to your taste

1. Boil the tomatoes until soft.

2. Fry the sesame seeds (be careful not to burn them).

3. Mix the tomatoes, sesame seeds and peanuts together and blend.

4. Heat the oil in a pan and add all the other ingredients – garlic, ginger, cumin powder, turmeric, lemon juice, salt, and chilli powder – to your tomato mixture. Add 125ml water and cook for about 15 minutes.

Stef Reid visited Anandaban Hospital to show her support for the Heal Nepal appeal. Until 27 April, the UK government will double your donations to Heal Nepal, meaning that every £1 donated will become £2, making twice the difference to find, cure and heal people affected by leprosy in Nepal. Give a gift to Heal Nepal today.

UK-AID-Donations&flag-RGB

 

Once abandoned, now thriving, Alina has found new hope at Anandaban Hospital

Alina, a patient at Anandaban Hospital in Nepal
Alina, a patient at Anandaban Hospital in Nepal

When you first meet Alina she seems just like any other 13-year-old girl, but her hands tell a different story.

She developed signs of leprosy at 10 years old, but was not given the correct treatment. This meant that she was not cured of the disease and that it began to affect her more severely, leading to clawed hands. The lack of sensation in her hands had led to Alina accidentally burning herself, causing infection and permanently damaged fingers.

Leprosy had also started to affect Alina’s eyes, putting her at risk of blindness as she became unable to blink away dust and dirt.

But her greatest pain, we found out, comes from being abandoned by her father. He left the family as soon as he found out she had leprosy and has not returned. Her mother works abroad and so Alina is cared for by her grandparents, the only other family she has.

Alina’s story of being rejected by someone so close to her is not unusual. There is a lot of stigma surrounding leprosy in Nepal and deep-seated fear of the disease means that so many patients at Anandaban Hospital, where Alina is receiving treatment, have had similar experiences.

Alina is having physiotherapy to help her regain use of her hands following reconstructive surgery.
Alina is having physiotherapy to help her regain use of her hands following reconstructive surgery.

The cure for leprosy, surgery and physiotherapy can provide physical healing and thanks to you, Alina has received the treatment she needs at Anandaban, undergoing surgery on her hands and eyes. But what’s just as important for people like Alina is experiencing emotional healing. While at the hospital, she has received loving care and support that has deeply touched her.

The staff there told us that Alina reminds them of a lotus flower. The flowers, native to Nepal, grow out of muddy waters, rising above the surface to bloom. Alina is determined to thrive, thanks to your generosity and the staff at Anandaban. Since the earthquake in Nepal, in 2015, patient numbers at the hospital have doubled to 40,000 a year, meaning that they are incredibly busy. But their passion for transforming lives remains.

“It is a real joy to see the happiness in the faces of leprosy patients after surgery,” said Dr Indra Napit, Medical Director.

A busy ward at Anandaban Hospital
A busy ward at Anandaban Hospital

There are many more people just like Alina who need help today. In 2017 there were more than 3,000 new cases of leprosy diagnosed in Nepal. At Anandaban, the country’s flagship leprosy hospital, people have the chance of regaining their mobility, freedom and dignity – and you have an amazing opportunity to help them.

Thanks to UK Aid Match, the UK government is doubling your gifts made to our Heal Nepal campaign before 27 April 2019. So a gift from you of £10 means that £20 will go towards helping to find, cure and heal people like Alina. This is a rare opportunity to make a huge difference to people affected by leprosy. Every gift from you will mean that more people can look forward to a more positive future thanks to dedicated staff at Anandaban Hospital.

Click here to give your gift, that will be doubled until 27 April. 

 

Help people like Avinash celebrate life again.

Today is St Patricks day. A day that celebrates the life of the patron saint of Ireland. To all our Irish friends Lá fhéile Pádraig sona duit (Happy St Patrick’s day in Gaelic).

Patrick was born in Britain circa AD 387 and kidnapped as a slave at the age of 16 he was taken to Ireland. He escaped six years later but around AD 432 he heard God’s call to serve the people of Ireland and share the Good News with them and so returned to Ireland. He purportedly baptised 12,000 people in a single day near a town called Killala – what incredible favour from God!

In Luke 4:17-19 we see a story about Jesus sharing his calling:
‘and the scroll of the prophet Isaiah was handed to him [Jesus]. Unrolling it, he found the place where it is written: “The Spirit of the Lord is on me, because he has anointed me to proclaim good news to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners and recovery of sight for the blind, to set the oppressed free, to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour.”

This moves me to think about the people The Leprosy Mission meet every day in many countries. People who find themselves on the edges. People who find themselves hearing the ‘bad’ news of having leprosy. People trapped by folk law and the chains of stigma. Prisoners of depression and fear, people who have little hope once they hear those words… ‘You have leprosy!’. Unlike Patrick people affected by leprosy feel there is no escape, but that is where people like you and I come in to the picture.

Untitled design (70)
Avinash is from a very remote area of Nepal. He was finally diagnosed with leprosy when he was 17 years old at Green Pastures Clinic in Pokhara. He regularly attends Anandaban Hospital where he receives care for his ulcers. 

We have the opportunity of sharing the Good News – ‘Today there is a cure. Today there is hope. Today you can escape the oppression you feel. Today you can be free!’  We may not be able to say this face to face but by being generous with our gifts and by praying we can help people know the favour of God.

Today Irish people all over the word celebrate with parades and parties sharing the joy of their heritage and feeling connected to people like themselves across the globe.

We can help people affected by leprosy celebrate life again.

Together we can help people like Avinash who since being helped by people like you says… “At festival time when people gather I go with my friends and pray out loud.” He is no longer afraid to be seen or heard. He is no longer afraid to shout out loud and show the effects that leprosy has had on his body, because he is free! He can now, like others, celebrate at festivals and be an unashamed member of his culture and society.

Thank you for all that you do for people like Avinash. Thank you for hearing God’s call to proclaim Good News. Thank you.

Untitled design (69)
Avinash at Anandaban Hospital, Nepal.