Once abandoned, now thriving, Alina has found new hope at Anandaban Hospital

Alina, a patient at Anandaban Hospital in Nepal
Alina, a patient at Anandaban Hospital in Nepal

When you first meet Alina she seems just like any other 13-year-old girl, but her hands tell a different story.

She developed signs of leprosy at 10 years old, but was not given the correct treatment. This meant that she was not cured of the disease and that it began to affect her more severely, leading to clawed hands. The lack of sensation in her hands had led to Alina accidentally burning herself, causing infection and permanently damaged fingers.

Leprosy had also started to affect Alina’s eyes, putting her at risk of blindness as she became unable to blink away dust and dirt.

But her greatest pain, we found out, comes from being abandoned by her father. He left the family as soon as he found out she had leprosy and has not returned. Her mother works abroad and so Alina is cared for by her grandparents, the only other family she has.

Alina’s story of being rejected by someone so close to her is not unusual. There is a lot of stigma surrounding leprosy in Nepal and deep-seated fear of the disease means that so many patients at Anandaban Hospital, where Alina is receiving treatment, have had similar experiences.

Alina is having physiotherapy to help her regain use of her hands following reconstructive surgery.
Alina is having physiotherapy to help her regain use of her hands following reconstructive surgery.

The cure for leprosy, surgery and physiotherapy can provide physical healing and thanks to you, Alina has received the treatment she needs at Anandaban, undergoing surgery on her hands and eyes. But what’s just as important for people like Alina is experiencing emotional healing. While at the hospital, she has received loving care and support that has deeply touched her.

The staff there told us that Alina reminds them of a lotus flower. The flowers, native to Nepal, grow out of muddy waters, rising above the surface to bloom. Alina is determined to thrive, thanks to your generosity and the staff at Anandaban. Since the earthquake in Nepal, in 2015, patient numbers at the hospital have doubled to 40,000 a year, meaning that they are incredibly busy. But their passion for transforming lives remains.

“It is a real joy to see the happiness in the faces of leprosy patients after surgery,” said Dr Indra Napit, Medical Director.

A busy ward at Anandaban Hospital
A busy ward at Anandaban Hospital

There are many more people just like Alina who need help today. In 2017 there were more than 3,000 new cases of leprosy diagnosed in Nepal. At Anandaban, the country’s flagship leprosy hospital, people have the chance of regaining their mobility, freedom and dignity – and you have an amazing opportunity to help them.

Thanks to UK Aid Match, the UK government is doubling your gifts made to our Heal Nepal campaign before 27 April 2019. So a gift from you of £10 means that £20 will go towards helping to find, cure and heal people like Alina. This is a rare opportunity to make a huge difference to people affected by leprosy. Every gift from you will mean that more people can look forward to a more positive future thanks to dedicated staff at Anandaban Hospital.

Click here to give your gift, that will be doubled until 27 April. 

 

Jutlen’s transformation

Some of the postcards you sent to Jutlen last summer
Some of the postcards you sent to Jutlen last summer

Helen Walton reflects on a very special reunion.

Do you remember Jutlen? Last summer, our appeal focused on Premananda Hospital in Kolkata, India, sharing his story. Jutlen was a 16-year-old boy alone in hospital, fearful for his future, in need of surgery on his hands and feet and deeply upset by the stigma he had suffered because of leprosy.

I, too, remember the day I met Jutlen, because it changed my life forever.

Jutlen, on the day I met him at Premananda Hospital in Kolkata.
Jutlen, on the day I met him at Premananda Hospital in Kolkata.

As I sat on Jutlen’s hospital bed, looking at the harrowed expression on his face as he told me his story, I saw such pain and hopelessness that it has haunted my heart ever since. I wept for this young man, for the injustice he has suffered and for his pain.

His parents had died and his best friend had refused to have anything to do with him once Jutlen told him he had leprosy. Although he was cured of the disease, he was alone, disabled and scared for his future. I left his bedside that day full of sadness for him and for his situation.

As part of last summer’s appeal, we asked you to send Jutlen and others like him your prayers and messages of support. It was wonderful to see the outpouring of love for this young man. Your good wishes for his future meant so much.

Returning to Kolkata recently, with a couple of hours to spare before my onward flight, I returned to Premananda Hospital. I was overwhelmed with curiosity as to Jutlen’s whereabouts. Where was he? How was he? As I was escorted to the men’s ward, I saw him. One of his legs was in plaster, indicating that he had recently had an operation – the reconstructive surgery he so badly needed to help him walk properly again.

Jutlen was completely transformed
Jutlen was completely transformed

What I hadn’t expected was the complete transformation that I saw. It wasn’t just the physical transformation – Jutlen’s smile was infectious; he was animated and excited to see me. Slowly he got off his bed, then knelt and touched my feet and knees, a gesture of thanks and gratitude.

Through the loving care he has received, all thanks to you, Jutlen has found hope again. In just a few short months his life has been turned around. He is healing from the effects of the rejection he felt and was looking forward to returning to education on leaving hospital.

It made my day to be able to spend time with Jutlen.
It made my day to be able to spend time with Jutlen.

When you supported Jutlen and others like him at Premananda Hospital, you helped turn a young man’s life around. Because of your kindness, Jutlen has found new hope. I’m so thankful that I got the chance to meet him again and see this for myself – and I couldn’t wait to share the news. As he rebuilds his life, please continue to remember Jutlen – as well as the other patients and staff at Premananda Hospital in your prayers.

Kate’s Purulia Diary Part Two; “Lavanya’s battle against leprosy had begun.”

In late 2016, Kate Gent visited Purulia Hospital in West Bengal to see how Leprosy Mission staff are dealing with a huge rise in patient numbers there. Here, she shares her story.

Lavanya sat staring at her hands – this said it all. Her battle against leprosy had begun.

We sat in the counselling room at Purulia Hospital, a shared space with no privacy. Another consultation was about to start and there were people queuing nearby.  I felt flustered for her.

Even the word leprosy is enough to fill people here in India with dread.  But I admired Lavanya’s courage in the face of adversity.

It took a huge amount of bravery for her to make the long journey back to the hospital to start her treatment and she was clearly feeling very anxious. I can see it in her eyes, her posture, as wrapped up in a cardigan and scarf, she clutches her hands together tightly.

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Examining Lavanya’s arm.

She’s experienced tingling and pain in her arm. There’s a risk this could be signs of nerve damage from leprosy. Without close monitoring this could develop into serious problems, such as immovable clawed hands.

The doctor presses her elbow to test the nerves; he says they have thickened. This isn’t good news.

He points out the pale skin patches, slightly faded but still numb. Leprosy must be so easy to misdiagnose without the skill and expertise of these doctors.

Lavanya’s lips tremble: she needs further tests.  In a tiny room, the physiotherapist examines her palms and soles of her feet. With her eyes closed, she points out where she feels sensation.

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In the physiotherapy room.

Leprosy has caused greater damage than she thought. Although her hands are still reasonably flexible, she will need continued monitoring of the nerves and physiotherapy.

She says she is okay, but then she puts her head in her hands. Tears begin to roll down her cheeks. Self consciously she looks at me and when she saw my eyes fill with tears too, gradually, she begins to open up.

When Lavanya first found the numb patches, she tried homeopathic remedies.  After three months she came to Purulia, having heard of the hospital’s reputation for skin and eye care, but her numbness was even worse by that point.

When she was diagnosed with leprosy she was really scared. Her husband seems supportive but he also tells her it’s a bad disease so she shouldn’t tell the neighbours about it.

She wouldn’t dare – she’s the only one with leprosy in the village. She will never tell her friends because she’s too afraid she will end up alone.

Her biggest concern is that her husband could turn against her. They have two little children; her youngest has just started walking and her son has just turned five.  If he were to throw her out, how could she manage alone?

My heart went out to Lavanya, and I prayed that God would help me to help her.  As our only shared language, she lent me a gentle, sad smile and wiped her tears with her scarf.

After I had followed her through her outpatient journey, we shared a few moments near the central courtyard.

A little girl came toddling over, her tiny arms outstretched. Lavanya bent down and scooped her up.  Her eyes lit up: her baby girl was there waiting for her.

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Lavanya and her daughter.

The road ahead is not going to be easy for this family. Although it’s fantastic that Lavanya’s got the cure and is in the hands of experts, there is still a lot for her to face. She will need Purulia Hospital more than ever, returning every month for her medicines, to learn physiotherapy exercises and to receive check-ups.

As our time together drew to a close, her little girl began rubbing her sleepy eyes, she turned her head and nestled into her mum, ready for their long journey back home – 60 miles from the hospital.

Even now I’m back in England, I think of Lavanya often. I’m so thankful that Purulia Hospital is uniquely placed in an area of India with high levels of leprosy.  But what weighs heavy on my heart is the strain this hospital is under.

There are so many more people who still need help and I would hate to see them turned away.  I owe it to Lavanya and her daughter to not let that happen. That’s why I resolved to tell as many people as I can about my visit to Purulia. The hospital needs a new Outpatients’ Department – and you can partner with The Leprosy Mission to make it happen. Find out how and give a gift today.