Making momos with Stef Reid and Dr Indra

Stef with prosthetics
Stef Reid visits the prosthetics department at Anandaban Hospital

On her recent trip to Nepal to visit Anandaban Hospital, Paralympian Stef Reid spent time with staff including Anandaban’s Medical Director Dr Indra Napit and his family. Former Celebrity Masterchef contestant Stef had the chance to try her hand at Nepalese cooking at one of Dr Indra’s ‘momo parties’, where he gathers friends together to make momos before tucking into a delicious meal together. He’s provided us with his recipe, so now you can make them too. Why not hold your own momo party and let us know how you get on?

How to make momos

480g plain flour
1kg minced chicken
50g chopped fresh coriander
150g chopped onions
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced ginger
1 tablespoon cumin powder
1 teaspoon turmeric
1 tablespoon sunflower oil
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Salt and chilli powder to your taste
Non-stick cooking spray

1. Mix together the flour and 375ml water in a bowl. Knead the dough well until it is medium firm and flexible. Cover and let rest for 30 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, mix together the chicken, coriander, onions, garlic, ginger, cumin, turmeric, lemon juice, salt and chilli powder (we use a tablespoon of salt and half a  teaspoon of chilli powder) in a bowl. Mix in 250ml water.

Kneading dough

3. To make the momo wrappers: break off a piece of dough weighing roughly 30g and roll into a ball. Place the ball on a flat surface and roll into a piece about three inches round with a rolling pin. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Rolling the dough
making wrappers
4. Spray a steamer pan with cooking spray.

5. Place a teaspoon of the chicken filling in the middle of a wrapper. Holding the wrapper in your left hand, use your right thumb and index finger to start pinching the edges of the wrapper together. Pinch and fold until the edges of the circle close up, then place the momo in the steamer pan. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling.

Adding filling
Uncooked momos
6. Fill the steamer pot half full with water and bring to a boil. Set the steamer pan with the momos on top of the pot and cover with a tight lid. Steam the momos for 15 minutes.

In the steamer
Cooked momos
7. Serve your hot momos with pickle (read on to find out how to make it) or another dip of your choice!

Stef Reid with finished momos

How to make pickle

500g tomatoes
250g sesame seeds
100g peanuts (fried)
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon minced ginger
1 teaspoon cumin powder
½ teaspoon turmeric
1 tablespoon sunflower oil
1 tablespoon lemon juice
Salt and chilli powder to your taste

1. Boil the tomatoes until soft.

2. Fry the sesame seeds (be careful not to burn them).

3. Mix the tomatoes, sesame seeds and peanuts together and blend.

4. Heat the oil in a pan and add all the other ingredients – garlic, ginger, cumin powder, turmeric, lemon juice, salt, and chilli powder – to your tomato mixture. Add 125ml water and cook for about 15 minutes.

Stef Reid visited Anandaban Hospital to show her support for the Heal Nepal appeal. Until 27 April, the UK government will double your donations to Heal Nepal, meaning that every £1 donated will become £2, making twice the difference to find, cure and heal people affected by leprosy in Nepal. Give a gift to Heal Nepal today.

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Good news for leprosy communities in Nigeria

‘The Spirit of the Lord is on me,
because he has anointed me
to proclaim good news to the poor.
He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners
and recovery of sight for the blind,
to set the oppressed free,
to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour.’

Luke 4:18-19

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Imad stands among his crops, grown thanks to agricultural training and a new well.

Imad came to live at Ammanawa leprosy community in Sokoto, Nigeria not long after developing symptoms of the disease in 1979. The community has grown up around the local hospital and his neighbours told him it would be the best place for him to go to get help.

Fortunately, completing his course of medication combined with diligent self-care of his hands and feet has meant that Imad, now 67, is free of disability. But even this did not stop people stigmatising him – prejudice against people affected by leprosy in his village was strong, so Imad stayed on at Ammanawa and has been there ever since – marrying, raising a family and farming on land near the hospital.

In this notoriously dry area of northern Nigeria, farming isn’t easy and families like Imad’s have often struggled to grow crops successfully. For an already-marginalised community like Ammanawa, that means greater poverty and uncertainty about having enough food.

This year, however, residents have seen some enormous changes take place, as part of a new project focusing on improving the lives of people living in leprosy communities.

“When I arrived at Ammanawa, I was amazed to see how people’s lives are being transformed,” said Programmes and Advocacy Officer Gareth Shrubsole, who visited Nigeria recently.

“We don’t often hear good news coming out of northern Nigeria and it is challenging place to work in, but in this project I really saw the scripture of Luke 4:18-19 being brought to life.

“The good news is that people are learning to farm their land to grow food and generate an income; those imprisoned by disabilities are getting freedom through provision of wheelchairs, crutches and prosthetic limbs; the blind are recovering their sight through cataract operations.

“What’s more, those who have been oppressed by leprosy stigma are being released as greater awareness is spread about the real causes of leprosy and people affected by it are empowered to speak out against stigma.”

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Imad at his new well.

In addition to learning more about farming, Imad has found his life revolutionised by a new tube well. The result is that, helped by his sons, he’s now growing numerous different crops – an impressive feat on land that is known for being so dry and difficult to farm.

“People like Imad are now benefiting from better hygiene and clean water thanks to new boreholes and latrines too. The Leprosy Mission team working in the area are doing wonderful work and it was a real privilege to be able to see it firsthand,”said Gareth.

“As I talked to Imad, it was wonderful to see the range of crops – fat onions, bright red chillies, sturdy cassava, and many more – that he has been able to nurture in this often barren land. It’s all thanks to the water supply from his new tube-well and his training in farming techniques.”

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Working the land.

It’s all thanks to your support and prayers that people like Imad are acquiring the new skills and resources they need to live life to the full – and it’s a huge encouragement to see the way people living in communities like Ammanawa have seen their lives turned around in the past year.

Aubergine curry from Sri Lanka

This festive season, as we look towards Sri Lanka, here’s a little something that one of our partners there wanted to give back to you. One of the things that our staff often look forward to when visiting Leprosy Mission projects overseas is the wonderful variety of foods they have the opportunity to sample. And so here’s a dish from Sri Lanka, as described by Praveen Gomez from Alliance Development Trust, one of our partners working to mobilise churches to tackle leprosy. It’s his mother’s recipe, using aubergine (brinjal) for a very tasty curry.

eggplant-1Ingredients

One onion, chopped
Two cloves of garlic, chopped
Two green chilies, sliced
A handful of curry leaves
One stick of lemon grass
One piece of pandan leaf (can be substitued with bay leaves)
One tomato, chopped
Three aubergines, sliced and quartered thickly
One teaspoon of curry powder
1/2 teaspoon of chili powder
1/4 teaspoon of saffron
One can of coconut milk
Oil
Salt

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1. Toss the aubergine with the chopped chilies, salt and curry powder

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2. In a pan, fry the curry leaves, herbs, onion, garlic and tomato

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3. Add the aubergine and cook for a few minutes.

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4. Add coconut milk and simmer. Do not allow the aubergine to overcook.

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5. Enjoy!