You’ve cured six year old Akira!

NTD and Research Coordinator Shabina Sadiq reflects on her recent visit to Sri Lanka.

I met Akira and her mum over a year ago when I went to visit The Leprosy Mission’s projects in Sri Lanka.

Like any child she was shy to begin with but very playful, mischievous and with a curious nature, wanting to know why so many people wanted to talk to her mum and not her. Her mum has leprosy and her dad left them when he learnt about his wife’s diagnosis. Akira was only a baby when he left and she has never seen him since.

Whilst we are talking to her mum, she mentions to the Project Officer and Doctor standing next to her my daughter has a skin patch on her upper arm”.

They immediately turn to Akira and ask to look at the patch.

It is small, the size of a finger print, but significant enough for the Project Officer to say “bring her in to the centre and we will take her for tests”.

Immediately, I find myself looking straight at Akira thinking ‘she looks fine’. Akira, oblivious to what is happening around her, looks at me smiling and pointing, as if to say let’s go and play outside.

I turn back to her mum and suddenly realise that I do not need to worry. Akira’s mum is a Leprosy Champion. I am standing beside an amazingly strong woman  who, like any mother, will fight for her child’s good health.

Over a year later I find myself back in Sri Lanka. Akira’s mum recognises me immediately and comes to shake my hand saying “it’s like meeting an old friend again”. She then points behind me.

I turn and see Akira in the distance, giggling with laughter and waving.

She has completed her MDT and looks like most happy children. She still has the mischievous look in her eye, one that at times I can relate to.

She looks healthy, loved and full of hope.

May 9 Blog
Six-year-old Akira’s future is full of hope after being cured of leprosy.

I have seen what can happen when people with leprosy receive the treatment they need quickly – this transformation is thanks to our amazing donors. It’s difficult to think about how different Akira’s life may have been if she hadn’t received the support and care she needed immediately.

Thanks to your support, our teams in Sri Lanka are able to change lives.

Thanks to you, teams in Sri Lanka are able to reach out and support people like Akira’s mum, giving them the confidence, skills and strength to overcome the stigma and discrimination associated with leprosy. Leprosy Champions, such as Akira’s mum, are able support others in their communities.

You have made it possible to train local project staff so they can recognise the signs of leprosy immediately – stopping leprosy in its tracks and preventing disability.

Thanks to you, leprosy doesn’t have the opportunity to steal hope and joy from little children like Akira.

Advertisements

Stopping for the one: my journey in India

Vicki Davison, Partnership Advisor, reflects on her recent visit to India.

My first time in India

“I never knew that a job could give me family around the world. I’ve been working at The Leprosy Mission for nearly two years now and, with my family here, I’ve laughed, cried, learned, and been both humbled and deeply moved. These people are the reason I get out of bed at 7.30 every morning when my alarm goes off…well, if I’m being honest, it’s more like 8am – I’m not a morning person! But it’s my brothers and sisters who are affected by leprosy, and our wonderful team overseas, who challenge, motivate, and inspire me to do what I do every day.

I recently had the privilege of meeting a few members of our worldwide family in person, during my first trip to India. Along with ten of our supporters from the UK, I had an incredible week visiting our projects in Andhra Pradesh. I wanted to share some of my experience with you…

Untitled design (35)

I’m still processing everything I heard, saw and experienced, but not for the reasons I expected. I’d been told about the vibrant aroma of spice stalls in the market, the vivid blend of colours as women dressed in sarees pass by, and the cacophony of engines revving and horns beeping as motorbikes, tuk-tuks, cars and lorries veer across the road, all vying for space across several lanes of unordered traffic.

I will probably never forget the scenic landscapes of lush rice paddies and tea plantations interspersed with small village communities.

But the images that are truly burned into my mind are the faces of the people I met; it is them and their stories that will have a lasting impact on me.

Rainbow Children’s Home

Our first visit was to Rainbow Children’s Home in Vizianagaram. Many children living in this area are orphaned or abandoned because of leprosy or HIV and have nowhere to go but the railways; they shelter in the stations and scavenge on the tracks. Staying in a station may sound safe, but the conditions there are unimaginable. Human faeces litter the floor and rats infest the platforms. Noise is constant as announcements blare and trains speed past, their carriages banging and clattering. Night time is the worst. As darkness sets in, the children are left vulnerable and unprotected as they try to sleep.

No child should be left in such danger, but for these children there is simply no other choice.

Brighter Future, one of The Leprosy Mission’s partners, responded to the needs of these children by setting up the Rainbow Children’s Home in 2004. There, the team care for 80 children, around 50 of whom are leprosy-affected.

I’d heard stories about the home and seen countless pictures of the children, but nothing compared to being there in person. Although some were shy at first, it wasn’t long before I was surrounded by little ones grasping for my hands, and older girls, still in their uniforms, introducing themselves and telling me about their day at St Ann’s school.

We sat together in their new dining area – a beautifully clean, tiled room – and listened to stories from some of the older children. Many explained how they had first come to the home more than ten years ago and were now studying at college, hoping to one day become teachers, nurses and engineers. As I glanced from the wide-eyed, curious faces of the little ones – some no more than five-years-old – to the young people standing confidently in front of us, it was impossible not to feel inspired.

I was surrounded by so many little lives that had once been written-off and cast aside, but were now filled with hope and potential because of the commitment of the team here, and the incredible generosity of supporters like you.

One boy who stood out to me was six-year-old Raju. Last year, our team found him and his older brother Prashant starving and alone on the streets, abandoned by their family.

A few years ago, their dad was diagnosed with leprosy. When Raju’s mother found out, she deserted her family; none of them have seen her since.

Despite struggling with a disabled foot caused by leprosy, Raju’s father worked as a labourer in the local fields to try and provide for his sons. Tragically, in his sadness he became an alcoholic, spending anything he earned on alcohol and sleeping wherever he fell. Raju and Prashant were left to fend for themselves, wandering naked in the streets and begging for food.

Thankfully, one of our team found them and brought them to the home.

My heart felt heavy listening to Raju’s story. I couldn’t imagine the confusion and heartbreak these two young boys must have felt as their mother disappeared and they watched their father become consumed by alcohol. I could hardly bear to think about their fear as they wandered the streets desperately searching for food, and slept unprotected in the darkness.

Little Raju’s beautiful smile hides a story filled with suffering that no child should ever face, but when we met I saw a sparkle in his eyes. He played confidently with the other kids at the home, and he is regularly attending school with his brother Prashant; they have become inseparable.

Raju told us how he loves school and dreams of one day becoming a pilot.

Thanks to support from people like you, Raju’s next big challenge is not to search for food or try to survive a night on the streets; it is to learn to ride a bike!”

Untitled design (52)
Raju (left) with his brother Prashant

He’s only seven years old, but already Anil has faced so much.

Programmes Officer Shabina Sadiq found her first visit to Leprosy Mission projects in Sri Lanka to be a deeply affecting experience. Read on as she tells her story.

My trip to Sri Lanka was my first overseas visit since starting work at The Leprosy Mission this year. I knew it would be eye-opening, but I’m not sure I was prepared for just how much it would affect me.

One of the key people I met on the trip was Rev Joshua, director of Kaveri Kala Manram (KKM), one of our partner organisations in Sri Lanka. He took us on a visit to a small village called Kristokulam to meet the residents, many of whom are affected by leprosy. While there, we were introduced to Diaya – a teacher at the local school – and some of her students.

Diaya started to tell us a little about what life is like for children in Kristokulam. She explained that around half the children in her class of 34 students have been diagnosed with leprosy – a shocking statistic even in Sri Lanka, which in 2015 had the highest rates of new child cases of leprosy of any country in the world*. Then, she introduced us to Anil, a seven-year-old boy who has recently been diagnosed with the disease.

rs6129
Anil (centre), with his friend Kulendran and their teacher, Diaya.

Anil was a shy boy who kept looking at his feet as he constantly touched at the leprosy patch on his face – a patch of lightened skin that he was obviously very self-conscious about. It struck me how thin he was, so we asked Diaya whether the children were getting enough to eat.

“Their families don’t have enough food,” she told us, “So they might only be eating one meal a day.”

radhika
Radhika, 14, is currently taking multidrug therapy (MDT) and is fortunate to have no lasting physical effects unlike her grandparents, who are both severely disabled by leprosy.

The school has been trying to help the children by providing them with a meal of lentils every day but I was shocked to see how small a portion they were being given. It’s all the school can afford.

“Malnutrition and leprosy make the children constantly weak and tired,” said Diaya. “They’re unable to concentrate in class and it affects their learning.”

Many of the children are taking multidrug therapy (MDT) to cure their leprosy. They need to be strong so their bodies can fight the disease and that means they need good nutrition. But with food as scarce as it is, that’s not easy.

kulendran
Kulendran, who is also seven years old and in Anil’s class. He’s currently taking multidrug therapy to cure his leprosy. His father is also affected by the disease.

Like many children in the region, Anil’s father went missing during Sri Lanka’s recent civil conflict and has never returned. Rev Joshua told us that Anil continues to be deeply affected by this. When I asked Anil about his hopes for the future he explained that he wants to be a policeman because he then might one day be able to find his dad.

It broke my heart to hear what had happened to Anil when he was diagnosed with leprosy: his mother and stepfather completed rejected him and threw him out of the house. I’m very close to my young nephews and it upset me so much to think of what it would be like for them to be shunned by their own family.

rs6463_v03
Anil and his grandfather

Thankfully, Anil’s grandparents took him in and are doing the best they can for him, but life is hard for them. His grandmother is disabled as a result of leprosy so she finds it difficult to carry out everyday tasks like cooking. They have no income – and so every day Anil relies on the small meal from the school food programme.

That’s why, this winter, you can do something amazing for Anil and children like him. We want to provide them with parcels containing food packed with essential nutrients that will help them grow strong as they take the medication they need to cure their leprosy.

It costs just £7.50 to buy a food parcel lasting a month – an opportunity to start making a huge difference in the life of a child like Anil. We need to act now to ensure a brighter future for these children. They urgently need our help.

I left Kristokulam with a heavy heart. There is so much more than leprosy affecting children like Anil – hunger, rejection, the loss of loved ones. In just seven years Anil has had to go through so much. But together, we can help him and his classmates turn their lives around.

*WHO statistics