Kate’s Purulia diary: “It’s not even 9am and the place is nearly full.”

In late 2016, Kate Gent visited Purulia Hospital in West Bengal to see how Leprosy Mission staff are dealing with a huge rise in patient numbers there. Here, she shares her story.

I’ve been told it’s a busy outpatients’ department here, with up to 300 people coming in every day.

It’s Monday morning and it seems like all 300 people have all turned up in the past half hour, but even more keep streaming in.

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The queues are long, but still more people stream in.

Mornings in Purulia begin before the sun rises, with people travelling from miles around to come here.  For me the sun is a low hazy glow on the horizon by the time I join the road.

The pinks and oranges filter through and paint the fields as amber.  From the guest house I see the steady flow of travellers increase, many trundling past the gate wrapped up in shawls and blankets. They were nearing the end of their long journeys.

I walk down the dusty track towards the hospital. A bullock cart trundles by; a couple arrive; a mum with a small baby, an elderly man barely able to walk, weary already from the night of travelling.

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Walking to the hospital

Before me, the waiting room is abuzz with people.  It’s not even 9am and the place is nearly full. I struggle to get past. There are queues and queues of people – the queue is snaking out of the door.  I’m amazed at the patience of the staff.

There aren’t enough seats and so many people are sat on the cold stone floor. This is the reality of the outpatients’ department of West Bengal’s specialist leprosy hospital in Purulia.

Later, it’s mid-afternoon and I hear a doctor call out “Quick, quick, come quick!”  There are over 50 people in the queue. “It’s out of control!” she says.

At the back of the pharmacy queue are the mum and baby who I had seen sitting on the floor hours ago. They look exhausted. The little girl wants to go home. Her mum strokes her head and soothes her as best she can.

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No more seats left

I make my way to a consultation room where an examination is taking place. The doctor does his best in the circumstances but it’s a shared space and there are no curtains or a quiet area to talk confidentially.

Wrapped in a shawl, a young woman looks around to see the queue behind her is now a swarm spilling out the door. It makes me feel uncomfortable as they lean on the low partition peering over while her leg is examined.

I then meet Lavanya. She’s travelled such a long way to get here, starting her journey in the dead of night. She travelled 60 miles by bus and on foot all to get to this place of healing.  I try to hide my shock as she comes into the consultation room, avoiding all eye contact.

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Lavanya

She’s beautiful, wearing a bright orange cardigan and a green sari.

She was diagnosed with leprosy recently, and is now coming to Purulia to start her multidrug therapy – the course of drugs that will cure her.

Both grace and pain linger in her eyes and something in me tells me that I need to sit and listen to her story.

Lavanya’s story had such an impact on me and I’ll be sharing the next part of my encounter with her very soon, so keep an eye out for my next post. Did you know that you can give a gift to help secure the future of Purulia Hospital’s outpatients’ department? It’s under immense strain and a new building with modern medical facilities is planned, but the hospital needs your help. Find out more.

Good news for leprosy communities in Nigeria

‘The Spirit of the Lord is on me,
because he has anointed me
to proclaim good news to the poor.
He has sent me to proclaim freedom for the prisoners
and recovery of sight for the blind,
to set the oppressed free,
to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favour.’

Luke 4:18-19

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Imad stands among his crops, grown thanks to agricultural training and a new well.

Imad came to live at Ammanawa leprosy community in Sokoto, Nigeria not long after developing symptoms of the disease in 1979. The community has grown up around the local hospital and his neighbours told him it would be the best place for him to go to get help.

Fortunately, completing his course of medication combined with diligent self-care of his hands and feet has meant that Imad, now 67, is free of disability. But even this did not stop people stigmatising him – prejudice against people affected by leprosy in his village was strong, so Imad stayed on at Ammanawa and has been there ever since – marrying, raising a family and farming on land near the hospital.

In this notoriously dry area of northern Nigeria, farming isn’t easy and families like Imad’s have often struggled to grow crops successfully. For an already-marginalised community like Ammanawa, that means greater poverty and uncertainty about having enough food.

This year, however, residents have seen some enormous changes take place, as part of a new project focusing on improving the lives of people living in leprosy communities.

“When I arrived at Ammanawa, I was amazed to see how people’s lives are being transformed,” said Programmes and Advocacy Officer Gareth Shrubsole, who visited Nigeria recently.

“We don’t often hear good news coming out of northern Nigeria and it is challenging place to work in, but in this project I really saw the scripture of Luke 4:18-19 being brought to life.

“The good news is that people are learning to farm their land to grow food and generate an income; those imprisoned by disabilities are getting freedom through provision of wheelchairs, crutches and prosthetic limbs; the blind are recovering their sight through cataract operations.

“What’s more, those who have been oppressed by leprosy stigma are being released as greater awareness is spread about the real causes of leprosy and people affected by it are empowered to speak out against stigma.”

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Imad at his new well.

In addition to learning more about farming, Imad has found his life revolutionised by a new tube well. The result is that, helped by his sons, he’s now growing numerous different crops – an impressive feat on land that is known for being so dry and difficult to farm.

“People like Imad are now benefiting from better hygiene and clean water thanks to new boreholes and latrines too. The Leprosy Mission team working in the area are doing wonderful work and it was a real privilege to be able to see it firsthand,”said Gareth.

“As I talked to Imad, it was wonderful to see the range of crops – fat onions, bright red chillies, sturdy cassava, and many more – that he has been able to nurture in this often barren land. It’s all thanks to the water supply from his new tube-well and his training in farming techniques.”

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Working the land.

It’s all thanks to your support and prayers that people like Imad are acquiring the new skills and resources they need to live life to the full – and it’s a huge encouragement to see the way people living in communities like Ammanawa have seen their lives turned around in the past year.

Aubergine curry from Sri Lanka

This festive season, as we look towards Sri Lanka, here’s a little something that one of our partners there wanted to give back to you. One of the things that our staff often look forward to when visiting Leprosy Mission projects overseas is the wonderful variety of foods they have the opportunity to sample. And so here’s a dish from Sri Lanka, as described by Praveen Gomez from Alliance Development Trust, one of our partners working to mobilise churches to tackle leprosy. It’s his mother’s recipe, using aubergine (brinjal) for a very tasty curry.

eggplant-1Ingredients

One onion, chopped
Two cloves of garlic, chopped
Two green chilies, sliced
A handful of curry leaves
One stick of lemon grass
One piece of pandan leaf (can be substitued with bay leaves)
One tomato, chopped
Three aubergines, sliced and quartered thickly
One teaspoon of curry powder
1/2 teaspoon of chili powder
1/4 teaspoon of saffron
One can of coconut milk
Oil
Salt

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1. Toss the aubergine with the chopped chilies, salt and curry powder

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2. In a pan, fry the curry leaves, herbs, onion, garlic and tomato

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3. Add the aubergine and cook for a few minutes.

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4. Add coconut milk and simmer. Do not allow the aubergine to overcook.

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5. Enjoy!